-topographical- existentialism

outdoors---hiking---climbing---alpinism---backpacking---South Dakota---funhogging
coffeentrees:

Photo by @jimmy_chin
One bedroom. No bath. Great views. No elevator. @kjorgeson and @tommycaldwell enjoying their #primerealestate. #yosemite #thegoodlife @thephotosociety by natgeo

coffeentrees:

Photo by @jimmy_chin
One bedroom. No bath. Great views. No elevator. @kjorgeson and @tommycaldwell enjoying their #primerealestate. #yosemite #thegoodlife @thephotosociety by natgeo

(via goandbe)

patagonia:

Standing atop Mt. Moran in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Photo submitted by Danny Beasse
Instagram @dannobobano

patagonia:

Standing atop Mt. Moran in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Photo submitted by Danny Beasse

Instagram @dannobobano

amnhnyc:

Happy birthday to Roald Amundsen, leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole. 
Born to a family of Norwegian shipowners on July 16, 1872, Amundsen knew by the age of 15 that he would one day be an explorer. 
In one of the most stirring tales in the annals of Antarctic exploration, the contest to reach the South Pole was between two leaders—Roald Amundsen on the Norwegian side and Robert Falcon Scott on the British—and the challenges they faced as they undertook their separate 1,800-mile journeys from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole and back. 
Amundsen was a meticulous planner; he realized that success was sure only if he correctly estimated the risks he would face, leaving little to chance. On the afternoon of December 14, 1911, Roald Amundsen and his team reached the geographical South Pole, had had won the race. 
Learn more about Amundsen and Scott’s expeditions in the exhibition Race to the End of the Earth, currently traveling. 

amnhnyc:

Happy birthday to Roald Amundsen, leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole. 

Born to a family of Norwegian shipowners on July 16, 1872, Amundsen knew by the age of 15 that he would one day be an explorer. 

In one of the most stirring tales in the annals of Antarctic exploration, the contest to reach the South Pole was between two leaders—Roald Amundsen on the Norwegian side and Robert Falcon Scott on the British—and the challenges they faced as they undertook their separate 1,800-mile journeys from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole and back. 

Amundsen was a meticulous planner; he realized that success was sure only if he correctly estimated the risks he would face, leaving little to chance. On the afternoon of December 14, 1911, Roald Amundsen and his team reached the geographical South Pole, had had won the race. 

Learn more about Amundsen and Scott’s expeditions in the exhibition Race to the End of the Earth, currently traveling

My Hands.

The Breh n Me. Chillin’, Killin’

davykesey:

We really didn’t have enough money, enough people, or enough time for our road trip. I almost called it off when I originally started planning it. But there will never be a good time to travel the country for four weeks, just like there will never be a good time to quit your job, read that book, or join a gym. You will probably never have enough money, time, connections, willpower, whatever—to feel ready to make a dream happen. And this is the lesson I learned: eventually you have to stop giving yourself excuses and make the jump. 

masonboos

(via thomasbuttons)

staff:

bonerfart:

princessparkleunicorn:

What is tumblrs definition of aesthetic??? Cuz I looked it up in the dictionary and y’all don’t make no sense

image

ジョージ・コスタン

Devils Tower, WY. July 15, 2014

Devils Tower, WY. July 15, 2014

van-life:

Model: 1987 VW Syncro
Location: Bondurant, WY 2014

van-life:

Model: 1987 VW Syncro

Location: Bondurant, WY 2014

Backside of Sylvan Lake.

Backside of Sylvan Lake.